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Full text of "Smith Academy Catalogue, 1888-1889"

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OF 



|S/T\p /^DE/T\Y, 



ftetfield, * /T\a55. 



1888~'89. 



,ii,lif|iiig||liiii^ 




CATALOGUE 



SMITH ACADEMY 



Hatfield, Mass. 



1888-89, 



JUHE, 1888. 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS.: 

PRESS OF GAZETTE PRINTING COMPANY. 

1888. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/smithacademycataOOunse 



Board of Jrustees. 



DAVID BILLINGS, Jr., 
ALPHEUS COWLES, 
WILLIAM H. DICKINSON, 
THADDEUS GRAVES, 
E. A. HUBBARD, 
SILAS G. HUBBARD, 
CHARLES K. MORTON, 
DANIEL W. WELLS. 



WILLIAM H. DICKINSON, President. 

ALPHEUS COWLES, Vice-President. 

SILAS G. HUBBARD, Treasurer. 

DAVID BILLINGS, Jr., Secretary and Auditor. 



COMMITTEES, 

ON BUILDINGS. 

WILLIAM H. DICKINSON, 
ALPHEUS COWLES, 
SILAS G. HUBBARD. 

VISITING. 

E. A. HUBBARD, 
THADDEUS GRAVES,- 
ALPHEUS COWLES. 

ON REAL ESTATE. 

DANIEL W. WELLS. 

(3) 



5eael?er5. 



WILLIAM ORR, Jr., A. B., Principal, 
Natural Science, Mathematics, and Greek. 

EMMA L. HUBBARD, A. M., Preceptress, 
English Literature and Latin. 

Miss CHARLOTTE E. PETTIS, 
History and Music. 

Rev. J. W. LANE, A. M., 

Instructor in Elocution. 



JOHN H. SANDERSON, 
Curator. 



(4) 



(Jraduate$. 



1876. 

Charles A. Wight, Anthony, Kantas. 

Carrie Elizabeth Graves, Mrs. Roswell Billings, . Hatfield. 

M. Antoinette Morton, Hatfield. 

Fannie E. Woodward, Halifax, Vt 

Emma Electa Porter, Mrs. David Billings, Jr., . Hatfield. 



1877. 

Clarence Eugene Belden, Hatfield. 

David Billings, Jr., Hatfield. 

Albert Lewis Dyer, Hatfield. 

Battle Augusta Brown, Hatfield. 

Maria Irene Curtis, Mrs. F. H. Bardwell, . . . Hatfield. 

Ltlla Hattte Peck, Mrs. Fred Pease, . . . Hatfield. 

Mart Louisa Watte, Hatfield. 

Carrie Lydia Warner, Hatfield. 



1879. 

Anna Hunt Billings, Hatfield. 

Mary E. Dodge, Hatfield. 

Caroline Sophia Porter, Hatfield. 

Nellie Augusta Watte, Hatfield. 

(5) 



SMITH ACADEMY. 



1880. 

Bertha Mellicent Fobes, .... 
Clara S. Hawkes, Mrs. Eros Darling, 
N. Gertrude Hubbard, Mrs. William Smith, 
Alice Woodward, Mrs. Frank Montague, 



So. Deerfield. 

Hatfield. 

Westhampton. 



1881. 

Henry Cutter, St. Louis, Mo. 

Charles Porter, New York City. 

Fannte Iola Bennett, Whately. 

Emily Gertrude Billings, Detroit, Mich. 

Kate Alice Chaffee, Springfield. 

Myra Lovina Howes, Mrs. Cooley Dickinson, . . Hatfield. 

Margaretta Miller, Hatfield. 

Lovisa Janes Montague, Westhampton. 

Amy Eliza Stebbins, Williamsburg. 

1882. 

George Douglass, Springfield. 

Albert Holcomb, Boston. 

Frank Edward Wing, Athol. 

Cora Belle Delano, Sunderland. 

Lizzie Iola Pearl, Boston. 

Emma Louisa Warfield, Conway. 

1883. 

Mary Annetta Whipple, Pelham. 

1884. 

Arthur Harland Beers, Whately. 

Herbert Leon Richardson, Williamsburg. 

Elsie Estella Elder, Whately. 

Luella Elizabeth Field, Hatfield. 

Sarah Gibbs Langdon, Hatfield. 

Charlotte Anna Porter, Springfield. 

(6) 



SMITH ACADEMY. 



1885. 

Arthur Lewylenn Damon, Chesterfield. 

Thomas Powers, Hatfield. 

Charlotte White Billings, Hatfield. 

1887. 

Charles Otis Wells, Hatfield. 

Hattie Amelia Carl, Hatfield. 

Carrie Clark Field, Hatfield. 

Clara Louise Graves, Hatfield. 

Laura Halsted Graves, Hatfield. 

Sarah Elizabeth Kingsley, Hatfield. 

Grace Belden Marsh, Hatfield. 

Lizzie Dwight Porter, Hatfield. 

Nellie Emma Powers, Hatfield. 

Grace Eliza Webber, Hatfield. 

M. Anna Wright, Hatfield. 




3Iqn|i\i is30cic(tior|. 



PRESIDENT. 

CLARENCE E. BELDEN'.— 1S77. 



VICE-PRESIDENT. 

Mrs. DAVID BILLINGS, Jb.,— 1837. 



P.ETARY. 

CHARLOTTE WHITE BILLINGS. ->V 



TREA-URER 

THOMAS POWBB8,- 1885. 



(8) 



-^:5tuder)ts.: ; 



Glass op 1 s 



Hattie Amelia Carl, Hatfield. 

Carrie Clark Field. ... Hatfield. 

Clara Louise Graves, // 

Laura Halsted Graves. .... Hatfield. 

Sarah Elizabeth Kingsley. H. 

Grace Beldex Marsh Hatfield. 

Lizzie Dwight Porter, Hatfield. 

Nellie Emma Powers, Hatfield. 

Grace Eliza Webber Hatfield. 

M Ax>-a Wright, Hatfield. 

Charles Otis Wells Hatfield. 



6LASS 0F 1888. 



Mart J axe Breor, Hatfield. 

Nellie Augusta Carl. Hatfield. 

Hattie Smith Marsh Hatfield. 

Ltzzte Emma Ryax Hatfield. 

George Estes Bartox Hatfield. 

a 



lO SMITH ACADEMY. 



6LASS 0P 1889. 



Jennie M. Barnes, . Hatfield. 

Bridget Celeste Dea, Hatfield. 

Myra Josephine Field, Hat-field. 

Augusta Lenox Graves, Hatfield. 

Mary Jane Mosher, Hatfield. 

Howard Morton Graves, . . . . . Hatfield. 

George William Hubbard, Hatfield. 



Glass @f 1891 



Caroline Mary Allaire, Hatfield. 

Cynthia Louisa Bard well, Hatfield. 

Martha Evelyn Bardwell, Hatfield. 

Clara Mabel Barton, Hatfield. 

Clara Dickinson Billings, Hatfield. 

Martha Malesta Dickinson, Whately. 

Rose Fairbank, Hatfield. 

Anna Myers Graves. Hatfield. 

Hattie White Kingsley, Hatfield. 

Lida Alma Kingsley, Hatfield. 

Nettie Marion Lowell, Hatfield. 

Bertha Burton Thayer, Miamiville, 

Harry James Barnes, Hatfield. 

Benjamin Parsons Dwight, Hatfield. 

Edgar Henry Field, Hatfield. 

William Augustus Morton, Hatfield. 

Thomas Mullany, Jr., Hatfield. 



5peeial 5 tu dei}ts 



Harry Delmont Abells, Hatfield. 

Daniel S. Bard well, Hatfield. 

James S. Bard well, Hatfield. 

George Sanford Belden, Hatfield. 

John Smith Carl, Hatfield. 

Henry Wendell Carl, Hatfield. 

Frank A. Cutter, Hatfield. 

William Henry Douglass, Hatfield. 

Horace Wiley Field, Hatfield. 

Archie P. Graves, Hatfield. 

Alexander Hade, Hatfield. 

Harry Hess, Enfield. 

James Hunt Parke, Detroit, Mich. 

Charles Frederick Peck, Hatfield. 

John Peltier, Chesterfield. 

Arthur Warner Shattuck, Hatfield. 

Alexander T. Stewart, New York City. 

Edson W. Strong, Hatfield. 

Leavitt T. Thayer, Hatfield. 

Fred Bates Thayer, Hatfield. 

Charles Wendell Wade, Hatfield. 

Charles Edward Warner, Hatfield. 

Joseph Harris Wight, Hatfield. 

Leland Howard Wight, Hatfield. 

Florence S. Atkins, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mabel Louise Billings, ' Hatfield. 

Carrie C. Cutter, Hatfield. 

Mary Ellen Cutter, Hatfield. 

Mary C. Dickinson, New York City. 

Ill) 



12 



SMITH ACADEMY. 



Elizabeth Fairbank, Hatfield. 

Fannie May Graves, Hatfield. 

Nellie Smith Jones, , Hatfield. 

Victoria Mary Lampro, Hatfield. 

Mary Eliza Marsh, Hatfield. 

Myra Pettigrew, Hatfield. 

Clara Elizabeth Sauerzapf, Hatfield. 

Carrie L. Smith, Hatfield. 



5u/T\(T\ary. 



Class of 1887, 
Class of 1888, 
Class of 1889, 
Class of 1891, 
Special Students, 



Total, 



77 




-McS/T)itt? /teade/r\y.*-<- 



TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Candidates for admission to the Academy must pass a satisfactory examina- 
tion in the following subjects : — 

Arithmetic. (1) Ability to perform accurately and quickly the fundament- 
al operations ; Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication and Division. 

(2) Factoring. Greatest Common Divisor. Least Common Multiple. 

(3) Fractions Common and Decimal. 

(4) Denominate Numbers. 

(5) United States Money. 

(6) Percentage. Profit and Loss. Commission. Taxes. Insurance. 

(7) Interest. Simple and Compound. 

(8) Square Root. 

(9) Problems in Mental Arithmetic, with analysis. 

Language. Ability to write a short letter, correct in form, punctuation, 
use of capitals, and construction of sentences. 

Grammar and Analysis. Parts of Speech. Complete conjugation of a 
verb. Ability to distinguish accurately and promptly, principal and subordi- 
nate clauses ; subject and object. 

Geography. (1) A thorough knowledge of the geography of the United States, 
Canada and Europe. 

(2) Outlines of remaining geography. 

(3) Map Drawing. Complete maps of the New England States. Outline 
maps of the United States, Canada and the British Isles. 

United States History. A thorough knowledge of the events preceding the 
Constitutional period. 

Music. A knowledge of the elements of music, and ability to sing easy ex- 
ercises preparatory to work in a Grammar or High School Music Reader. 

Reading and Spelling. Exercises in ordinary Fourth Reader. 

Penmanship. Ability to write well easy exercises. 

(13) 



14 



SMITH ACADEMY. 



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SMITH ACADEMY. 17 

Three separate courses of study have been arranged to meet the varying 
wants of pupils attending the Academy. 

The English course is intended for pupils who do not desire to pursue the 
study of the Latin or modern languages and who are not preparing for scien- 
tific schools or colleges. 

The course has been carefully planned with a view to giving the student 
such mental discipline as shall enable him to observe accurately, to reason 
clearly, and to express himself clearly and forcibly in speech or writing. 
The knowledge gained should enable the student to take an intelligent in- 
terest in questions relating to the political and social life of the day, and 
in the development of science and art. It is also hoped to awaken a love 
and appreciation of the truths of nature, and to cultivate a taste for what 
is best in literature. 

MATHEMATICS.— In the first term's work, a text-book in Mental 
Arithmetic is used, and the pupil is trained in methods of logical analysis 
and in accuracy in the use of numbers. Three terms are devoted to the 
subject of Algebra. In this study, habits of accuracy of work and concen- 
tration of thought are acquired. The work in Inventional Geometry con- 
sists in original demonstrations of simple problems and gives a knowledge of 
the figures used in the regular work in Geometry. Plane Geometry is stud- 
ied for two terms, and gives ability to hold a course of reasoning in mind. 
A review of Arithmetic in Senior year closes the course in Mathematics. 

SCIENCE.— The various studies which come under this head have been 
arranged with a view to a harmonious development of the course. In the 
work of the first term the student is encouraged and trained to observe the 
facts of nature in the three kingdoms of the mineral, the plant and the an- 
imal. The second term the important facts in regard to the human body 
are taught. The method is objective, and the work for each lesson is ar- 
ranged by topic. Attention is continually called to matters relating to pres- 
ervation of health. 

The spring term is devoted to Botany, and to the work of observing is 
added that of classifying. In Zoology the pupil is led to note the leading 
characteristics of the main divisions of the animal kingdom, and is given 
practical work in dissecting and in making collections. Constant use is made 
of the microscope in the study of the lower forms. 

In the winter term of the second year, the study of minerals and rock 
formation prepares the pupil for the work in Geology, which occupies the 
spring term. In Geology, opportunity is given for much outdoor work in 
studying formations. 

In the course of Physics the " language of experiment" is used. The work 
is elementary, and is intended to give a clear idea of the forces of nature 
and their action on material bodies. The student is led to connect the truths 
3 



18 SMITH ACADEMY. 

learned in the class room with the facts of his every day experience. Physi- 
cal Geography, which considers the relations between the life of plant and 
animal and the earth and the forces of nature, reviews to a certain extent, 
the work already done. 

In Astronomy much emphasis is laid on the study of the heavens and ob- 
servation of the various phenomena there to be discovered. The course in Sci- 
ence closes with two terms' work in Chemistry ; the first term is devoted to 
lectures and i*ecitations on topics in theoretical and non-metallic Chemistry, 
and the last term to recitations and Laboratory work in metallic Chemistry. 
This course is intended to give the pupil a taste for scientific knowledge and 
a scientific habit of mind. 

LITERATURE.— The purpose of the work done in Literature is to de- 
velop a taste for good reading and stimulate independent criticism. To this 
end a few works of modern American writers are taken up in detail ; this study 
of texts is followed by a brief resume" of American literature. Representative 
English authors are next carefully studied, beginning with those of the present 
century, and the course concludes with a history of English Literature in 
chronological order. Attention is called to derivations, to choice of words, to 
figures of speech, and to forms of versification. The life of an author is 
studied so far as it may serve to interpret his writings or to develop interest in 
the man and his work. 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION— The English language is the one tool 
which every pupil must use all his life. Skill in the use of this tool is of the 
utmost importance. Accordingly especial care is given to the department of 
English Grammar and Composition, and an effort is made to have the work 
progressive. 

The regular course for the first year consists of work in English Grammar, 
Composition and Rhetoric, and practical work is given prominence. In the 
preparations of compositions for the rhetorical exercises the following plan has 
been adopted. Passages from books are assigned to the younger pupils to be 
re-written in their own words; it is believed that while the pupil thus reproduces 
ideas supplied him by another, he can devote all his energy to making as near- 
ly perfect as possible, that part which originates with him, viz. : the form of 
expression, and the mechanical execution of the essay. To the older pupil 
subjects are given to be read up, and discussed in his own way. From the 
most advanced pupils essays are required showing more inventive powers. 

In correcting the compositions an attempt is made to point out the errors so 
as to prevent their repetition, thus making the regular composition work a con- 
tinuous rhetorical drill, instead of the useless burden on both pupil and teacher 
which it is so apt to become. 

HISTORY.— The course in History begins with a careful review of the 
History of the United States, extending over two terms. The aim in this study 



SMITH ACADEMY. 19 

is to acquaint the pupils with the growth of national life, the pivots of history 
and the great epochs. The topical method is used, and that the pupil may as- 
sociate places and events, map work is given a prominent place. Pictures are 
employed to increase the interest of the student. 

The study of Civics can be taken up in connection with the second term's 
work in United States History. This study is intended to give a knowledge 
of the civil polity of the United States and of the duties of citizens. 

In English History the aim is to give the pupil a knowledge of the political 
development of England, and of the events which led to the formation of 
our earliest states. Two terms are devoted to this subject. 

GENERAL HISTORY.— The purpose of the work done in Ancient Histo- 
ry is to acquaint the pupil with the contributions of each nation to civiliza- 
tion, and with the results which ancient peoples obtained by a thoughtful study 
of the same national problems which perplex us at the present. 

With this purpose in mind the following nations are taken up : 
Asiatic Nations. 
African Nations. 
Persian Empire. 
Grecian States and Colonies. 
Macedonian Empire. 
Roman Empire. 

Time, — One term. 

In Modern History the subjects considered are: — the re-organization of soci- 
ety in Europe after the fall of the Roman Empire, the political changes, the 
progress in civilization, and the events that have brought the world up to the 
present standard of civilization and knowledge. 

MENTAL AND MORAL SCIENCE.— A brief course in these branches 
is given in the winter term of senior year. 

GENERAL EXERCISES.— Instruction in Reading, Spelling and Pen- 
manship is given to pupils in the first year of the course. Arrangements have 
been made for an exercise in Drawing for the entire school. 

A short exercise in music is given to the entire school four days in the week. 

Weekly rhetorical exercises are held, for which careful preparation is re- 
quired. 

GENERAL COURSE. — In this course Latin is substituted for certain 
work in the sciences and history. The extent of the work to be done in Latin is 
fixed by the requirements for admission to college. It is desirable that no pupil 
shall begin the study who does not intend to pursue it through at least two 
years. The first year is largely occupied with drill in forms ; in the second 
year a practical knowledge of syntax is gained through translating ; with the 
third year some insight into general grammatical principles and the peculiari- 
ties of the Latin language is expected, and by the time the fourth year is 



20 SMITH ACADEMY. 

reached, it is to be hoped that the pupil will have gained such familiarity with 
the language as to be able to give some attention to the literary quality of the 
work he is reading. From the very beginning attention is directed to deriva- 
tion and composition of both Latin and English words. In translating an ac- 
curate representation of the Latin is required, while no expressions are tolerat- 
ed which would not be admissible in an English essay. Pupils also may substi- 
tute French or German for the Latin of the last two years. The course is in- 
tended to fit pupils for higher schools where Greek is not required for admission. 
It is arranged so as to give the pupil in addition to this training in Latin and 
Mathematics, a general knowledge of the main facts in History and Science. 

CLASSICAL COURSE.— This course is intended to fit students for ad- 
mission to College. 



TEXT BOOKS. 

MATHEMATICS.— Stoddard's Intellectual Arithmetic. Wentworth's 
Algebra. Wentworth's Plane Geometry. Spencer's Inventional Geometry. 
Loomis' Trigonometry. 

SCIENCE.— Child's Book of Nature. Hutchinson's Physiology. Gray's 
How Plants Grow. Colton's Zoology. Shaler's Geology. Avery's Elements 
of Natural Philosophy. Lockyer's Astronomy. Chemistry and Mineralogy; 
Lectures, Reference work. 

ENGLISH.— Bigsby's Elements of English Language. Richardson's Primer 
of American Literature. Genung's High School Rhetoric. Mugan's English 
Grammar. Gilman's First Steps in English Literature. 

HISTORY.— Scudder's History of the United States. Montgomery's Eng- 
lish History. Fyffe's Primer of Greek History. Creighton's Primer of Ro- 
man History. Swinton's General History. 

LATIN.— Collar and Daniell's Latin Lessons. Allen and Greenough's Cae- 
sar, Composition, Cicero, Virgil, Ovid, and Latin Grammar. 

GREEK.— White's Greek Lessons. Goodwin's Anabasis and Greek Gram- 
mar. Jones' Exercises in Greek Composition. Boise's Six Books, Homer's 
Iliad. 

FRENCH.— Bocher's French Grammar. 

GERMAN.— Collars Eysenbach. Studienund Plaudereien. 



SMITH ACADEMY. 21 



SMITH ACADEMY 



Smith Academy was founded in 1870, by Miss Sophia Smith of Hatfield, 
Mass., with an endowment fund of Seventy-five Thousand Dollars. 

In accordance with the will of the Founder, the Academy is situated in 
Hatfield, a pleasant village on the Connecticut River, and on the line of the 
Connecticut River Railroad. The town lies among the richest farming lands in 
New England, and is a place of great natural beauty. The pursuits and char- 
acter of the people furnish conditions very favorable for student life. 

The Academy Building, a handsome structure, furnishes ample accommoda- 
tions for all departments of the school. The study and recitation rooms are 
situated on the second floor. Large play-rooms are found in the basement, 
while the third story contains a Hall, capable of seating four hundred persons, 
which is used for rhetorical and public exercises. 

The School possesses a large and well selected Reference Library, establish- 
ed from the proceeds of exhibitions given by the students. Members of the 
school are free to cousult this library in preparation for rhetorical exercises 
and in reference work in studies. This library contains about three hundred 
volumes, and additions are made as the needs of the school require. 

The Town Library is situated in the Academy building, and is open to the 
students. It contains three thousand volumes and this number is increased 
yearly through appropriations by the town. This library is well provided 
with works on History and Science, and is proving of increased value to the 
school since the adoption of the decimal system of cataloging and classifica- 
tion. 

CABINETS. — The Geological cabinet contains specimens illustrating im- 
portant formations. Cold and silver ores from Nevada, minerals from inter- 
esting localities in the Holy Land, copper ores from the Lake Superior re- 
gion, and native sulphur from Utah, contributed by friends of the school add 
to the value of the collection. The several classes in natural science are en- 
couraged to visit the fine collections at Amherst College and Smith College. 

PHYSICAL APPARATUS.— The Academy is now provided with a com- 
plete set of insti uments f or illustrating the study of Physics. This apparatus 
was selected with the greatest care and imported from the celebrated maker, 
Carl Gerhardt, Bonn, Germany. The instruments are of excellent workmaa- 
ship and have proved highly reliable in all experiments. 

CHEMICAL APPARATUS.— The Chemical Laboratory is furnished 
with a complete stock of chemicals. Working tables provided with running 
water, and other necessary appliances are used by the students in practical 
work in analysis. Full provision is also made for experiments in connection 
with lectures on the science. 



22 SMITH ACADEMY. 

A fine microscope is used by the classes in Botany and Natural History, 
and collections are being formed to illustrate these branches of study. 

The south recitation room has been fitted up for the use of the Solar Lan- 
tern, and the school now enjoys the use of a large number of views of locali- 
ties in Europe and America. These views are of the greatest value in the 
study of History. 

A number of casts, models, crayon and free hand studies are used in the 
department of Drawing. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS.— The government of the school is placed 
in charge of the Principal. 

Students are required to preserve due order and to apply themselves 
faithfully to study. 

Students are expected to be present at every regular exercise of the school 
during the term. 

Members of the Academy from abroad are required to attend church on 
the Sabbath, and not to leave town without permission. 

Examinations are held month]} 7 in each department, and a record of the at- 
tendance, conduct and scholarship of each member of the school is sent month- 
ly to parents or guardians. 

Students failing to pass the monthly examinations are required to make up 
such work. 

Students are permitted to join any class for which they are prepared. 

As far as possible, pupils should follow the regular course. 

Students completing the course of study in the English, General or Classical 
Department will receive the diploma of the Institution. 

EXPENSES.— Tuition.— In no case is tuition charged for less than half a 
term. It is payable the third Wednesday of each term. 

The charges for tuition are as follows : 

English Course, per term, $8.00 

General or Classical Course, per term, . . . £9.00 

Board, including room, fuel and lights, in private families varies from $3.00 
to £5.00 per week. 

Furnished rooms can be obtained at very reasonable rates. 

Students of moderate tastes can attend the Academy for the school year of 
thirty-eight weeks at an expense of £175. 

SCHOLARSHIP FUND— The income of a fund of Ten Thousand Dol- 
lars can be applied to the aid of worthy students who shall remain connected 
with the school not less than one year. Application for aid should be made ear- 
ly in the school year. 

For further information apply to the Principal, Hatfield, Mass. 



Qalepdar. 



1887-1888. 



Fall Term begins 
Thanksgiving Recess, 
Fall Term ends, 
Winter Term begins, 
Holiday Recess, 
Spring Vacation, 
Winter Term ends, 
Spring Term begins, . 
School Exhibition, 
Sermon Before the School, 

Memorial Services, 
Class Exercises, ) 

Alumni Meeting, £ 
Graduation Exercises, 
Spring Term closes, 



Tuesday, Sept. 13, L8S' 

Wednesday, Nov. 23-Tuesday, Nov. 29. 

Monday, Dec. 12, 1887, 

Tuesday, Dec. 13, 1SS7 

Friday, Dec. 23, -Tuesday, Jan. 3, 1888 

Tuesday, Men. 13,-Wed. Men. 28, 1888, 

Tuesday, April 10, 1888 

. Wednesday, April 11, 1888 

. Friday, June 29, 1888 

| . . . Sunday, July 1, 1888, 

Monday, July, 2, 1888 

Tuesday, July 3, 1888. 
Tuesday, July 3, 1888 



1888-1389. 



Fall Term begins . 
Fall Term ends, 
Thanksgiving Recess, 
Winter Term begins, 
Holiday Recess, 
Winter Term, ends, . 
Spring Term, begins, 
School Exhibition, . 
Sermon Before the School, ) 
Memorial Services, ) 

Class Exercises, Alumni Meeting, 
Graduation Exercises, 
Spring Term ends, .... 
Entrance Examination, 



Tuesday, 
Friday 



Wednesday, Sept 

. Tuesday, Nov. 

Nov. 27-Wed. Dec, 

Wednesday, Dec 

, Dec. 1,-Wed. Jan 

Tuesday, March 

Wednesday, Men. 

Friday, June 

Sunday, June 

Monday, June 

Tuesday, June 

Tuesday, June 

Wednesday, June 



5, 1888. 
27, 1888. 

5, 1888. 
, 5, 1888. 

2, 1889. 

12, 1889. 
27, 1889. 

13, 1889. 

16, 1889. 

17, 1889. 

18, 1889. 

18, 1889. 

19, 1889. 



1889-1890. 



Fall Term begins, . 
Fall Term ends, 
Thanksgiving Recess, 
Holiday Recess, 
Winter Term closes, 
Spring Term begins, 
School Exhibition, 
Sermon before the School, 
Memorial Services, 



Wednesday, Sept. 4, 1889. 

Tuesday, Nov. 26, 1889. 

. Tuesday, Nov. 26 3 -Wed. Dec. 4, 1889. 

Friday, Dec. 20, 1889,-Thursday, Jan. 2, 1890. 

. Wednesday, March 12, 1890. 

. Wednesday, March 26, 1890. 

Friday, June 13, 1890. 

I . . Sunday, June 15, 1890. 



Alumni Meeting, Monday, June 16, 1890. 

Spring Term closes, Tuesday, June 17, 1890. 

Entrance Examination, . . . Wednesday, June 18, 1890. 



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